Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorValor Martínez, Carmenes-ES
dc.contributor.authorVilá Trepat, Irenees-ES
dc.contributor.authorRedondo Palomo, Raqueles-ES
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-11T14:54:46Z
dc.date.available2022-01-11T14:54:46Z
dc.date.issued11/01/2022es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1865-1992es_ES
dc.identifier.uri10.1007/s12208-021-00329-9es_ES
dc.descriptionArtículos en revistases_ES
dc.description.abstractHealthy eating is a main concern to public policy. Despite the public attention that overweight and obesity has received in recent years, research is still short of evidence about fiber consumption, even though fiber intake represents the third pillar of a healthy diet. This study assesses whether a volitional intervention based on goal planning and educational information raises fiber intake among healthy individuals. We test the effectiveness of implementation intentions accompanied by educational information on fiber intake in a 2x2x2 experiment with 205 university students. The results show that fiber intake did not significantly increase. However, the groups that had made plans for goal attainment narrowed their intention-behavior gap, and those receiving educational information had more knowledge about fiber-rich food. These results are puzzling as fiber intake meets the conditions where implementation intentions would work best. The authors suggest that to raise fiber intake, a combined strategy that involves manufacturers, public authorities and health professionals is needed to create a supportive environment so that individuals can successfully implement their plans.es-ES
dc.description.abstractHealthy eating is a main concern to public policy. Despite the public attention that overweight and obesity has received in recent years, research is still short of evidence about fiber consumption, even though fiber intake represents the third pillar of a healthy diet. This study assesses whether a volitional intervention based on goal planning and educational information raises fiber intake among healthy individuals. We test the effectiveness of implementation intentions accompanied by educational information on fiber intake in a 2x2x2 experiment with 205 university students. The results show that fiber intake did not significantly increase. However, the groups that had made plans for goal attainment narrowed their intention-behavior gap, and those receiving educational information had more knowledge about fiber-rich food. These results are puzzling as fiber intake meets the conditions where implementation intentions would work best. The authors suggest that to raise fiber intake, a combined strategy that involves manufacturers, public authorities and health professionals is needed to create a supportive environment so that individuals can successfully implement their plans.en-GB
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.documentes_ES
dc.language.isoes-ESes_ES
dc.rightses_ES
dc.rights.uries_ES
dc.sourceRevista: International Review on Public and Nonprofit Marketing , Periodo: 1, Volumen: , Número: , Página inicial: 1, Página final: 10es_ES
dc.subject.otherEmpresa, economía y sostenibilidad (E-SOST)es_ES
dc.titleCan implementation intentions increase fibre intake? An examination of the effect of planning and educational informationes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.description.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_ES
dc.rights.holderConsultar en la revistaes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccesses_ES
dc.keywordsHealthy diet, implementation intentions, goal planning, education, fiber intake.es-ES
dc.keywordsHealthy diet, implementation intentions, goal planning, education, fiber intake.en-GB


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Artículos
    Artículos de revista, capítulos de libro y contribuciones en congresos publicadas.

Show simple item record