Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11531/39289
Title: Development and validation of a Paternalism & autonomist care assessment
Authors: Fernández-Ballesteros García, Rocío
Sánchez-Izquierdo Alonso, Macarena
Olmos, Ricardo
Huici, Carmen
Caprara, Giovanna
Santacreu, Marta
Ribera Casado, José Manuel
Cruz Jentoft, Alfonso
Issue Date:  3
Abstract: Aim: There is a need for a validated instrument to measure the type of care (paternalism or person‐centred) provided for older adults. Since paternalism and person‐centred care are the most important caregiving styles in the field of care and as they are usually opposed, the study aims to develop and establish psychometrics data of an instrument to identify paternalistic and autonomist behaviours in older adults care contexts, which can help to enhance care practice. Design: Instrument development. Methods: After observing and standardizing behaviours in formal care contexts in 2016, an instrument was developed and proceeding to a first validation using standard validation techniques among caregivers in two care settings during 2016 2017: senior citizen centres and older adult day care centres. Results: The Paternalist/Autonomist Care Assessment (PACA) is a 30‐item, behaviourbased instrument which measures both the appraisal of caregivers on elements of care (Care Appraisal Scale‐ PACA‐Appraisal) and the occurrence of behaviours (Occurrence of Care in Context‐ PACA‐Occurrence). The Paternalist/Autonomist Care Assessment (PACA) was validated in 160 professional caregivers and was able to discriminate two factors: paternalistic or overprotective behaviours and autonomist behaviours. However, these factors were not fully dichotomous and were shown to coexist to some degree. Conclusion: The instrument displayed good psychometric properties to measure paternalism and autonomy in older adult care. Moreover, it showed that the two types of care are not antagonistic and can coexist, with overprotective behaviours being more frequent in contexts of care for more dependent persons. Impact: There are no validated instruments to measure paternalism and person‐centred behaviour in care contexts. The two measures yielded by the PACA show good construct and concurrent empirical validity, internal consistency, and convergent and discriminant validity. Family caregiver, professional caregivers, nurses, older adults.
Aim: There is a need for a validated instrument to measure the type of care (paternalism or person‐centred) provided for older adults. Since paternalism and person‐centred care are the most important caregiving styles in the field of care and as they are usually opposed, the study aims to develop and establish psychometrics data of an instrument to identify paternalistic and autonomist behaviours in older adults care contexts, which can help to enhance care practice. Design: Instrument development. Methods: After observing and standardizing behaviours in formal care contexts in 2016, an instrument was developed and proceeding to a first validation using standard validation techniques among caregivers in two care settings during 2016 2017: senior citizen centres and older adult day care centres. Results: The Paternalist/Autonomist Care Assessment (PACA) is a 30‐item, behaviourbased instrument which measures both the appraisal of caregivers on elements of care (Care Appraisal Scale‐ PACA‐Appraisal) and the occurrence of behaviours (Occurrence of Care in Context‐ PACA‐Occurrence). The Paternalist/Autonomist Care Assessment (PACA) was validated in 160 professional caregivers and was able to discriminate two factors: paternalistic or overprotective behaviours and autonomist behaviours. However, these factors were not fully dichotomous and were shown to coexist to some degree. Conclusion: The instrument displayed good psychometric properties to measure paternalism and autonomy in older adult care. Moreover, it showed that the two types of care are not antagonistic and can coexist, with overprotective behaviours being more frequent in contexts of care for more dependent persons. Impact: There are no validated instruments to measure paternalism and person‐centred behaviour in care contexts. The two measures yielded by the PACA show good construct and concurrent empirical validity, internal consistency, and convergent and discriminant validity. Family caregiver, professional caregivers, nurses, older adults.
Description: Artículos en revistas
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11531/39289
ISSN: 0309-2402
Appears in Collections:Artículos



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