Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11531/39560
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dc.contributor.authorSánchez-Izquierdo Alonso, Macarenaes-ES
dc.contributor.authorSantacreu, Martaes-ES
dc.contributor.authorOlmos, Ricardoes-ES
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Ballesteros García, Rocíoes-ES
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-26T06:09:23Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-26T06:09:23Z-
dc.date.issued26/08/2019es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1176-9092es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.2147/CIA.S213644es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11531/39560-
dc.descriptionArtículos en revistases_ES
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Paternalism, assuming control of aged care, is a widespread orientation in older adults care. Paternalistic attitudes and practices are commonly understood as a threat to the freedom and autonomy of a person, making patients more dependent. Therefore, the reduction of these attitudes and behaviors is a primary goal for any older adult health and social care situation. The aim of this preliminary study is to develop a behavioral intervention to decrease paternalistic behaviors in formal caregivers and to increase those care behaviors which promote autonomy at post-intervention (1 week) and at follow-up (14 weeks). Methods: A sample of 118 professional caregiver volunteers working in day care centers and nursing homes were assigned to quasi-experimental (N=47) and control (N=71) conditions. The intervention consisted of 3 weekly group sessions. Individual and contextual measures were collected: 1) the primary outcome variable was the type of care (paternalistic versus autonomist) measured through the self-report Paternalist/Autonomist Care Assessment (PACA); 2) A 10-item caregiver self-register of paternalistic behaviors was carried out, 3) Finally, in order to assess the potential effects on observed behavior both in caregiver and older adult functioning at a contextual level, the five institutions were assessed through the SERA-RS. Results: Compared with the control group, caregivers in the behavioral intervention group displayed significantly lower paternalistic appraisals at posttest and follow-up. Regarding the intervention group, caregivers at posttest and follow-up showed significantly greater occurrence of autonomist behaviors being promoted and lower paternalistic appraisal. The results regarding the effect on the institutions showed better personnel performance and older adult functioning. Conclusion: Caregivers who followed the intervention learned to better identify older adult needs; although we did not find significant differences in autonomy occurrence compared with the control group, a behavioral intervention may promote more autonomist environments and, therefore, better personnel and older adult functioning.es-ES
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Paternalism, assuming control of aged care, is a widespread orientation in older adults care. Paternalistic attitudes and practices are commonly understood as a threat to the freedom and autonomy of a person, making patients more dependent. Therefore, the reduction of these attitudes and behaviors is a primary goal for any older adult health and social care situation. The aim of this preliminary study is to develop a behavioral intervention to decrease paternalistic behaviors in formal caregivers and to increase those care behaviors which promote autonomy at post-intervention (1 week) and at follow-up (14 weeks). Methods: A sample of 118 professional caregiver volunteers working in day care centers and nursing homes were assigned to quasi-experimental (N=47) and control (N=71) conditions. The intervention consisted of 3 weekly group sessions. Individual and contextual measures were collected: 1) the primary outcome variable was the type of care (paternalistic versus autonomist) measured through the self-report Paternalist/Autonomist Care Assessment (PACA); 2) A 10-item caregiver self-register of paternalistic behaviors was carried out, 3) Finally, in order to assess the potential effects on observed behavior both in caregiver and older adult functioning at a contextual level, the five institutions were assessed through the SERA-RS. Results: Compared with the control group, caregivers in the behavioral intervention group displayed significantly lower paternalistic appraisals at posttest and follow-up. Regarding the intervention group, caregivers at posttest and follow-up showed significantly greater occurrence of autonomist behaviors being promoted and lower paternalistic appraisal. The results regarding the effect on the institutions showed better personnel performance and older adult functioning. Conclusion: Caregivers who followed the intervention learned to better identify older adult needs; although we did not find significant differences in autonomy occurrence compared with the control group, a behavioral intervention may promote more autonomist environments and, therefore, better personnel and older adult functioning.en-GB
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfes_ES
dc.language.isoes-ESes_ES
dc.rightsCreative Commons Reconocimiento-NoComercial-SinObraDerivada Españaes_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/es/es_ES
dc.sourceRevista: Clinical Interventions in Aging, Periodo: 1, Volumen: 2019, Número: , Página inicial: 1515, Página final: 1525es_ES
dc.titleA training intervention to reduce paternalistic care and promote autonomy: a preliminary studyes_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.description.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_ES
dc.rights.holderes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.keywordspaternalism, autonomy, caregivers, behavioral interventiones-ES
dc.keywordspaternalism, autonomy, caregivers, behavioral interventionen-GB
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